Newsletter

December 02,2022 Facilitating Innovation

Top 5 Entrepreneurs

Top 5 Entrepreneurs

Top 5 Entrepreneurs

Top 5 Entrepreneurs

What can we learn from others. Probably little from these cases but it peaks interest. Our team ranked the Top 5 Entrepreneurs.

Our Top 5:

5. Steve Jobs

You can’t really make a self-respecting “famous entrepreneurs” list without throwing in Steve Jobs. Jobs dropped out of college because his family couldn’t handle the financial burden of his education. He unofficially continued to audit classes, living off free meals from the local Hare Krishna temple and returning Coke bottles for change just to get by. Jobs credited the calligraphy class he stopped in on as his inspiration for the Mac’s revolutionary typefaces and font design.

Jobs went on to have an unbelievable career, eventually forming the Apple Computer Company with his childhood friend and electronics expert Steve Wozniak. Often referred to as “The Grandfather of the Digital Revolution,” Jobs forever changed the consumer electronics industry. At the time of his death, his net worth was over $8.3 billion, and his influence will be felt for many digital generations to come.

4. Benjamin Franklin

Only an entrepreneur would conduct some of the wacky experiments old Benny was always up to. Franklin is credited with creating the lightening rod, bifocals, and the Franklin stove (yeah, that last one might have been a bit of a flop).

Like many famous entrepreneurs before and after him, Franklin was a man of a thousand hats. Scientist, printer, politician, inventor, author, diplomat, and savvy businessman were just a few of his many trades.

3. Oprah Winfrey

I think Oprah Winfrey has one of the most amazing modern rags-to-riches stories of all time. As you’re probably well aware, Oprah is the richest African American of the 21st century, and with a net worth of over $3 billion, she is regarded as arguably the most influential woman in the world. Her incredible success is all the more impressive considering her rough upbringing. The daughter of an unmarried teen who worked as a housemaid, Oprah grew up in extreme poverty. Her family was so poor that, as a child, Oprah was teased at school for wearing dresses made of potato sacks.

2. Andrew Carnegie

Just hearing Andrew Carnegie’s name brings back yawns and daydream distractions from high school history class. I had no interest in Carnegie back in school, but today he serves as a pretty amazing example of entrepreneurship.

Carnegie had a really rough life growing up. He spent his childhood working in factories, and at night he forced himself to sleep as a way to forget his constant hunger.

Carnegie eventually worked his way up to becoming a superintendent for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company before creating several of his own businesses, the most successful being the Carnegie Steel Mill. Despite being one of the richest Americans of all-time, he also serves as a class act example of generosity.

Following his belief that “the man who dies rich dies disgraced,” Carnegie donated nearly 90 percent of his wealth to various charities and foundations. His is widely considered one of the largest benefactors of libraries and educational institutions across the country.

1. John D. Rockefeller

Even though we give these Gilded Age guys a lot of tough love for being so filthy rich, you can’t say they didn’t do good with their fortunes.

One of the world’s wealthiest individuals of all time, Rockefeller was born the son of a traveling salesman. He showed early entrepreneurial promise selling candy and doing odd jobs for neighbors, eventually going on to become the founder of the Standard Oil Company. There’s no business quite like oil business, and it made Rockefeller filthy rich.

References

Buying Your Way Into Entrepreneurship

Read More about Culture

Let 9m Facilitate Your New Culture

Share This